The mofo guide to | Yarra Valley pinot noir

Vinomofo
By Vinomofo
about 1 year ago
3 min read

The Yarra Valley continues to prove itself to be home to world class pinot noir and chardonnay - and delivering exceptional value to boot. Here’s a quick rundown on Yarra Valley pinot - what, where and when it’s best, and why we love it too.


What’s great about Yarra Valley pinot noir

The Yarra Valley’s broadly considered a cool-climate region - but the real ones know it’s not a one trick pony, with a range of elevations, aspects and soil types on offer. So what does this mean? It means that winemakers here can find their own unique expression of pinot noir, with a focus on fruit character produced by those growing conditions. No one trick pony indeed - there’s heaps to discover when it comes to Yarra Valley pinot, and it's also blended into traditional method champagne-style sparkling with its cousin chardonnay. 


What to expect with a Yarra Valley pinot noir

Like its cousin in the valley chardonnay, Yarra Valley pinot noir is more “modern” in style - light through to medium-bodied, with silky tannins and texture. Ballerinas, not bodybuilders. Whole bunch ferments aren’t uncommon, drawing out aromatic florals and bright red fruits whilst also preserving those more savoury characters. And given the variations in growing sites, you’re likely to see the full spectrum of flavours in pinot noir coming out of the Yarra Valley - from perfumed, fruit forward and light, to deep, structured and savoury. Whichever pinot you pick, there's one for you.


What temperature should I serve Yarra Valley pinot noir at?

It depends how you like your pinot, mofo! Yarra Valley pinot noir is one of those rare beasts of a red can sometimes present better slightly chilled when it’s younger, given that bright acidity - it may be sacrilege to old timers who think all red should be room temperature, but slightly chilled works wonders to bring out the best of those bright fruits and floral characters. Give it an hour in the fridge before you plan to drink it, and see how it rewards you. For more developed examples with a bit more age and structure, room temp is great.


What foods pair with Yarra Valley pinot noir?

Yarra Valley pinot noir is a great sparring partner for lighter protein dishes with earthy undertones - we’re talking about dishes like roast duck in a plum sauce, grilled salmon, mushroom risotto, and roast lamb with anchovies. It’ll also go great with your more creamy cheeses on offer too - brie or camembert style cheese are Yarra Valley classics too, so skip on that old “grows together/goes together” pairing mantra here.  


When should I be drinking Yarra Valley pinot noir?

You’ll find us saying this about Yarra Valley chardonnay too, but it’s true - it’s an all-occasions-all-seasons sipper. Light enough to carry the conversation at a barbecue with the friends and fam, plus examples with complexity to ponder over a roast during those crisp autumn and winter months too. And with heaps of unique wines to find, there’s never been a better time to dip your toe in the water and discover what’s so great about a Yarra Valley pinot.


Keen to start sipping some Yarra Valley pinot? No worries - check out our latest here.

Hey Kids!

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  • to supply alcohol to a person under the age of 18 years (penalty exceeds $17,000).
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Liquor Licence No. 36300937

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We acknowledge this place always was, and always will be Aboriginal land.