Ace your wine game in 2022

Vinomofo
By Vinomofo
3 months ago
3 min read

The time has come. Sneakers are toight. Hawk-Eye is powered up. Caps straightened on ball kids. And the 2022 Australian Open trophy has been spit polished.

Park yourself on the couch or a sunny spot in Rod Laver Arena for nail-biting tennis – with a side of the dramatic from racket-throwing ol’ mate Nick Kyrgios

Celebrate your version of the Australian Open with a wine pairing to enhance each draw of the tournament. Don’t get caught without your bevy!

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Get chardy’ed during the men’s draw 

Much like the ever popular chardonnay, how you watch the Aussie Open men’s draws is entirely personal. You could be cheering on the fruity Spaniard, Nadal, with a bright and perky chardonnay; or getting behind a bold and buttery wildcard like crowd favourite Andy Murray. Just use the next few rounds as the blank canvas for your chardonnay adventures. Whether it’s a double-handed back hand or an iconic drop-shot, just like tennis players, winemakers love to flex their techniques and leave their own imprint – a quality that chardonnay gives them in spades (the winemakers, not the tennis players).

Slay with rosé for the women’s draw 

Digging for a wine just as bold, elegant and versatile as the female players in the 2022 Australian Open? Reach for your summer-time fave, rosé. Much like defending women’s champ Naomi Osaka, this style continues to wow wine drinkers of all palates – whether you’re after something crisp and bone-dry or a fruitier flavour bomb. Pair a classy daytime match with a chilled pale salmon-coloured rosé and have yourself a Barty Party in the evening with a slightly musky (bit like those post-match tennis towels) copper-gold rosé. 

Do it for Dylan with Australia’s fav wine 

Is there a wine more synonymous with Australia than shiraz? We think not. The same can be said for Aussie tennis champ, Dylan Alcott OAM. The men’s wheelchair tennis star is taking to the court for his final shot at winning his fourth Aussie Open Men’s Singles Final. He’s the classic shiraz of the tennis world and will surely be added to the cellar of tennis history as an all-time great. Diede de Groot of the Netherlands is the defending champ for the women’s wheelchair draw and she’s absolutely dripping with awards – much like the Jim Barry Lodge 2019 Shiraz

Two-of-a-kind doubles

In honour of the men’s and women’s doubles, we give you a two-of-a-kind – queue a Lindsay Lohan montage of learning an intricate handshake at the end of a jetty. Pinot grigio and pinot gris, while made from the same grape, carry with them two quite different flavour profiles. Switch on a doubles match (men’s, women’s, mixed – ball’s in your court) and choose between the Italian-style pinot grigio (picked earlier than gris, it’s a light, dry and minerally expression of apples, pears and citrus with fine acidity and a savoury character) or the French-style pinot gris (fleshy-spicy pears, apples, and citrusy core). Get the lowdown on the perfect food pairings for the pinot duo.

Top up for the AO 2022 final

Round out this year’s Australian Open by cracking open a bottle of bubbles. Could be an Italian prosecco, a bougie bottle of French Champagne or an Aussie sparkling – whatever your pick, yell your darned hardest from the sidelines and do us proud.

Game, set, match. 

Hey Kids!

Under the Liquor Control Reform Act 1998 it is an offence:

  • to supply alcohol to a person under the age of 18 years (penalty exceeds $8,000).
  • for a person under the age of 18 years to purchase or receive liquor (penalty exceeds $700)

Liquor Licence No. 36128660

Seriously

At Vinomofo, we love our wine, but we like to also lead long and happy lives, and be good to the world and the people in it. We all try to drink responsibly, in moderation, and we really hope you do too.

Don’t be that person…

Acknowledgement of Country

Vinomofo acknowledges the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people as the traditional custodians of the land on which we live and work. We pay our respects to their Elders past, present and emerging, and recognise their continued connection to the land and waters of this country.

We acknowledge this place always was, and always will be Aboriginal land.